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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/9155
Title: Genetic Structure of Tibeto-Burman Populations of Bangladesh: Evaluating the Gene Flow along the Sides of Bay-of-Bengal
Authors: Gazi N.N.
Tamang R.
Singh V.K.
Ferdous A.
Pathak A.K.
Singh M.
Anugula S.
Veeraiah P.
Kadarkaraisamy S.
Yadav B.K.
Reddy A.G.
Rani D.S.
Qadri S.S.
Singh L.
Chaubey G.
Thangaraj K.
Published in: PLoS ONE
Abstract: Human settlement and migrations along sides of Bay-of-Bengal have played a vital role in shaping the genetic landscape of Bangladesh, Eastern India and Southeast Asia. Bangladesh and Northeast India form the vital land bridge between the South and Southeast Asia. To reconstruct the population history of this region and to see whether this diverse region geographically acted as a corridor or barrier for human interaction between South Asia and Southeast Asia, we, for the first time analyzed high resolution uniparental (mtDNA and Y chromosome) and biparental autosomal genetic markers among aboriginal Bangladesh tribes currently speaking Tibeto-Burman language. All the three studied populations; Chakma, Marma and Tripura from Bangladesh showed strikingly high homogeneity among themselves and strong affinities to Northeast Indian Tibeto-Burman groups. However, they show substantially higher molecular diversity than Northeast Indian populations. Unlike Austroasiatic (Munda) speakers of India, we observed equal role of both males and females in shaping the Tibeto-Burman expansion in Southern Asia. Moreover, it is noteworthy that in admixture proportion, TB populations of Bangladesh carry substantially higher mainland Indian ancestry component than Northeast Indian Tibeto-Burmans. Largely similar expansion ages of two major paternal haplogroups (O2a and O3a3c), suggested that they arose before the differentiation of any language group and approximately at the same time. Contrary to the scenario proposed for colonization of Northeast India as male founder effect that occurred within the past 4,000 years, we suggest a significantly deep colonization of this region. Overall, our extensive analysis revealed that the population history of South Asian Tibeto-Burman speakers is more complex than it was suggested before. © 2013 Gazi et al.
Citation: PLoS ONE (2013), 8(10): -
URI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075064
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/9155
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 19326203
Author Scopus IDs: 33767644200
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36642149200
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55875099900
55043240100
55874767500
55874751600
57209494362
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8976736500
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55628587703
57199506601
6603011487
Author Affiliations: Gazi, N.N., Center for Advanced Research in Physical, Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Tamang, R., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Singh, V.K., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Ferdous, A., Center for Advanced Research in Physical, Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Pathak, A.K., Department of Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia, Estonian Biocentre, Tartu, Estonia
Singh, M., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Anugula, S., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Veeraiah, P., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Kadarkaraisamy, S., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Yadav, B.K., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Reddy, A.G., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Rani, D.S., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Qadri, S.S., Center for Advanced Research in Physical, Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Singh, L., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India, Genome Foundation, Hyderabad, India, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Chaubey, G., Estonian Biocentre, Tartu, Estonia
Thangaraj, K., Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India
Corresponding Author: Thangaraj, K.; Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, India; email: thangs@ccmb.res.in
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [HY]

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