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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/8845
Title: The effect of cathodal tDCS on fear extinction: A cross-measures study
Authors: Ganho-Ávila A.
Gonçalves Ó.F.
Guiomar R.
Boggio P.S.
Asthana M.K.
Krypotos A.-M.
Almeida J.
Published in: PLoS ONE
Abstract: Background Extinction-based procedures are often used to inhibit maladaptive fear responses. However, because extinction procedures show efficacy limitations, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been suggested as a promising add-on enhancer. Objective In this study, we tested how cathodal tDCS over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex affects extinction and tried to unveil the processes at play that boost the effectiveness of extinction procedures and its translational potential to the treatment of anxiety disorders. Methods We implemented a fear conditioning paradigm whereby 41 healthy women (mean age = 20.51 ± 5.0) were assigned to either cathodal tDCS (n = 27) or sham tDCS (n = 16). Fear responses were measured with self-reports, autonomic responses, and implicit avoidance tendencies. Results Cathodal tDCS shows no statistically significant effect in extinction, according to self-reports, and seems to even negatively affect fear conditioned skin conductance responses. However, one to three months after the tDCS session and extinction, we found a group difference in the action tendencies towards the neutral stimuli (F (1, 41) = 12.04, p = .001, ?p2 = .227), with the cathodal tDCS group (as opposed to the sham group) showing a safety learning (a positive bias towards the CS-), with a moderate effect size. This suggests that cathodal tDCS may foster stimuli discrimination, leading to a decreased generalization effect. Discussion Cathodal tDCS may have enhanced long-term distinctiveness between threatening cues and perceptively similar neutral cues through a disambiguation process of the value of the neutral stimuli—a therapeutic target in anxiety disorders. Future studies should confirm these results and extend the study of cathodal tDCS effect on short term avoidance tendencies. © 2019 Ganho-Ávila et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Citation: PLoS ONE (2019), 14(9): -
URI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0221282
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/8845
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Public Library of Science
ISSN: 19326203
Author Scopus IDs: 57201857667
8668771500
57211048670
10340985700
55877434600
54791132900
37015443600
Author Affiliations: Ganho-Ávila, A., Proaction Laboratory, Cognitive and Behavior Center for Research and Intervention Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, Neuropsychophysiology Lab, CiPsi, School of Psychology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal
Gonçalves, Ó.F., Neuropsychophysiology Lab, CiPsi, School of Psychology, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
Guiomar, R., Proaction Laboratory, Cognitive and Behavior Center for Research and Intervention Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Boggio, P.S., Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory and Developmental Disorders Program, Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo, Brazil
Asthana, M.K., Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory and Developmental Disorders Program, Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo, Brazil, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India
Krypotos, A.-M., Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
Almeida, J., Proaction Laboratory, Cognitive and Behavior Center for Research and Intervention Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
Funding Details: AG? is supported by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portugal and Programa COMPETE [grants numbers SFRH/BD/80945/2011, PTDC/MHC-PAP/5618/2014 (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-016836); http://www.poci-compete2020. pt/]. JA is supported by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portugal and Programa COMPETE [grants numbers PTDC/MHC-PAP/ 5618/2014 (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-016836), PTDC/MHC-PCN/3575/2012, PTDC/MHC-PCN/ 0522/2014, PTDC/MHC-PCN/6805/2014; https:// www.fct.pt/index.phtml.en]. The Cognitive and Behavioral Center for Research and Intervention of the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences of the University of Coimbra is supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology and the Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science through national funds and co-financed by FEDER through COMPETE2020 under the PT2020 Partnership Agreement [UID/ PSI/01662/2013; https://www.portugal2020.pt]. The Psychology Research Centre of the University of Minho is supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology and the Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science through national funds and co-financed by FEDER through COMPETE2020 under the PT2020 Partnership Agreement (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007653). The Proaction Laboratory and the PTDC/ MHC-PAP/5618/2014 (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-016836) directly supported this research. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. We thank Soares, M.J and Gerardo, B. for data collection and preprocessing.
Corresponding Author: Ganho-Ávila, A.; Proaction Laboratory, Cognitive and Behavior Center for Research and Intervention Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of CoimbraPortugal; email: ganhoavila@fpce.uc.pt
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [HS]

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