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dc.contributor.authorBusin Y.-
dc.contributor.authorLukasova K.-
dc.contributor.authorAsthana, Manish Kumar-
dc.contributor.authorMacedo E.C.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-09T05:17:35Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-09T05:17:35Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Psychology (2018), 8(JAN): --
dc.identifier.issn16641078-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02332-
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/8798-
dc.description.abstractPast studies have found asymmetry biases in human emotion recognition. The left side bias refers to preferential looking at the left-hemiface when actively exploring face images. However, these studies have been mainly conducted with static and frontally oriented stimuli, whereas real-life emotion recognition takes place on dynamic faces viewed from different angles. The aim of this study was to assess the judgment of genuine vs. masked expressions in dynamic movie clips of faces rotated to the right or left side. Forty-eight participants judged the expressions on faces displaying genuine or masked happy, sad, and fearful emotions. The head of the actor was either rotated to the left by a 45° angle, thus showing the left side of the face (standard orientation), or inverted, with the same face shown from the right side perspective. The eye movements were registered by the eye tracker and the data were analyzed for the inverse efficiency score (IES), the number of fixations, gaze time on the whole face and in the regions of interest. Results showed shorter IESs and gaze times for happy compared to sad and fearful emotions, but no difference was found for these variables between sad and fearful emotions. The left side preference was evident from comparisons of the number of fixations. Standard stimuli received a higher number of fixations than inverted ones. However, gaze time was long on inverted compared to standard faces. Number of fixations on exposed hemiface interacted with the emotions decreasing from happy to sad and fearful. An opposite pattern was found for the occluded hemiface. These results suggest a change in fixation patterns in the rotated faces that may be beneficial for the judgments of expressions. Furthermore, this study replicated the effects of the judgment of genuine and masked emotions using dynamic faces. © 2018 Busin, Lukasova, Asthana and Macedo.-
dc.language.isoen_US-
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychology-
dc.subjectDynamic emotions-
dc.subjectEmotion judgment-
dc.subjectEvent-elicited masked emotions-
dc.subjectEye movements-
dc.subjectGaze pattern-
dc.subjectGenuine emotions-
dc.subjectLeft side preference-
dc.titleHemiface differences in visual exploration patterns when judging the authenticity of facial expressions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.scopusid57200223550-
dc.scopusid55883803700-
dc.scopusid55877434600-
dc.scopusid56926845400-
dc.affiliationBusin, Y., Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory and Developmental Disorders Program, Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo, Brazil-
dc.affiliationLukasova, K., Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory and Developmental Disorders Program, Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo, Brazil, Center of Mathematics, Computation and Cognition, Federal University of ABC (UFABC), São Bernardo, Brazil-
dc.affiliationAsthana, M.K., Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, India-
dc.affiliationMacedo, E.C., Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory and Developmental Disorders Program, Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo, Brazil-
dc.description.fundingEM is a CNPq research fellow and YB was supported by CAPES.-
dc.description.correspondingauthorLukasova, K.; Social and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory and Developmental Disorders Program, Center for Health and Biological Sciences, Mackenzie Presbyterian UniversityBrazil; email: katerinaluka@gmail.com-
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [HS]

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