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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/6230
Title: Neutral buoyancy of titanium-rich melts in the deep lunar interior
Authors: Van Kan Parker M.
Sanloup C.
Sator N.
Guillot B.
Tronche E.J.
Perrillat J.-P.
Mezouar M.
Rai N.
Van Westrenen W.
Published in: Nature Geoscience
Abstract: The absence of moonquakes originating deeper than about 1,100 km (ref.) implies that the lower mantle of the Moon could be partially molten. Up to 30% melt by volume has been estimated to exist between about 1,200 and 1,350 km depth 2. However, the absence of recent volcanic activity at the Moon's surface implies that such deep partial melts must be at least as dense as their surroundings. Here we use a combination of in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption techniques and molecular dynamics simulations to determine the density range of primitive lunar melts at pressures equivalent to those in the lunar interior. We find that only melts that contain about 16 wt% titanium dioxide are neutrally buoyant at depths corresponding to the top of the proposed partial melt zone. These titanium-rich melts are formed by deep partial melting of titanium-rich rocks. As such rocks are thought to have formed at shallow levels during crystallization of the lunar magma ocean, we infer that a significant vertical transport of mass occurred before melt formation. Our measurements therefore provide evidence for a large-scale overturn of the lunar mantle shortly after crystallization of the magma ocean and point to the continuing influence of a dense, titanium-rich reservoir on lunar interior evolution. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
Citation: Nature Geoscience (2012), 5(3): 186-189
URI: https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo1402
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/6230
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 17520894
Author Scopus IDs: 33068424500
6603435280
6507518576
7101700183
16508216800
8701203300
7003799217
36137863700
6602710945
Author Affiliations: Van Kan Parker, M., Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Sanloup, C., UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7193, Paris, France, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, United Kingdom
Sator, N., Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée (UMR7600), Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France
Guillot, B., Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée (UMR7600), Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France
Tronche, E.J., Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Perrillat, J.-P., Laboratoire de Sciences de la Terre, Université de Lyon, UMR5570-CNRS-ENS Lyon-Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Rue Raphaël Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne, France
Mezouar, M., European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble, France
Rai, N., Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Van Westrenen, W., Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Funding Details: This work was financially supported by a European Young Investigators award and Netherlands Space Office User Support Programme Space Research grant to W.v.W., and a European Research Council starting grant (FP7 grant agreement no. 259649) to C.S. We acknowledge the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility for provision of synchrotron radiation facilities and thank D. R. Neuville for carrying out 1-bar density measurements.
Corresponding Author: Van Westrenen, W.; Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, Netherlands; email: w.van.westrenen@vu.nl
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [ES]

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