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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/24790
Title: Capturing transformation of flood hazard over a large River Basin under changing climate using a top-down approach
Authors: Gusain A.
Prakash Mohanty, MohitP.
Ghosh S.
Chatterjee C.
Karmakar S.
Published in: Science of the Total Environment
Abstract: Existing flood modeling studies over coastal catchments involving different combinations of model chain setup imparting complex information fails to entail the needs of policy or decision-makers. Thus, a comprehensive framework that pertains to the requirements of practitioners and provides more perspicuous flood hazard information is required. In this paper, a novel approach translating complex flood hazard information in the form of decision priority maps derived using a rational combination of models (physical and statistical) is elucidated at the finest administrative scale. The proposed methodology is illustrated over a highly flood-prone deltaic region in Mahanadi River Basin, India, to characterize impacts of climate change for a 1:100 years return period flood event under future conditions (2026–2055). The modeled flood events are further analyzed to capture the transformation dynamics of flood hazard classes (FHCs) in near-future, for prioritizing areas with greater hazard potential. Interestingly, the results capture a high transformation characteristic from low to high FHCs in agriculture-dominated areas, which are significantly greater than the areas experiencing flood hazard reduction. The results show a significant increase of 12.5% and 27.35% in areas with high FHCs under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Moreover, a notable climate change response is indicated under both climate change scenarios, with approximately 22% (RCP4.5) and 25% (RCP8.5) in villages showing a drastic increment in flood hazard magnitude. The results thus highlight the importance of identifying and prioritizing the areas for flood adaptation where a relative change in flood hazard potential is higher due to climate change. Therefore, we conclude that this study can provide an insight into the implication of new approaches for effective communication of flood information by bridging the gaps between scientific communities and decision-makers in appraisal for better flood adaptation measures. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
Citation: Science of the Total Environment, 726
URI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.138600
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/24790
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Keywords: Decision priority mapping
Flood hazard
Hazard transformation matrix
Hydro-meteorological
Mahanadi River Basin
Model chain setup
ISSN: 489697
Author Scopus IDs: 57203973375
57203633749
10341128500
56238635800
13805286500
Author Affiliations: Gusain, A., Environmental Science and Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India
Mohanty, M.P., Environmental Science and Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India
Ghosh, S., Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India, Interdisciplinary Programme in Climate Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India, Centre for Urban Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India
Chatterjee, C., Department of Agricultural and Food Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302, India
Karmakar, S., Environmental Science and Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India, Interdisciplinary Programme in Climate Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India, Centre for Urban Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India
Funding Details: The work presented here is supported financially by ISRO-IIT (B)-Space Technology Cell (STC) through sponsored projects (RD/0114-ISROC00-013 [14ISROC009] and RD/0119-ISROC00-001), and Department of Science & Technology (SPLICE ? Climate Change Programme), GoI (Project reference numbers DST/CCP/CoE/140/2018). The authors acknowledge the World Climate Research Programme's Working Group on coupled Modeling, which is responsible for CMIP, and we thank the modeling groups for producing and making available their model output through the U.S. Department of Energy's Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) portal. The authors thank different government organizations such as the India Meteorological Department, Central Water Commission, and the National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC, Hyderabad) for providing crucial datasets that enable the authors to carry out research effectively. The authors sincerely thank the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay) for providing all the computational facilities. We thank the anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions in this manuscript. 14ISROC009, RD/0114-ISROC00-013, RD/0119-ISROC00-001; U.S. Department of Energy, USDOE; Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Science and Technology, India, डीएसटी; Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, IITB; Department of Science and Technology, Government of West Bengal, DST: DST/CCP/CoE/140/2018
Corresponding Author: Karmakar, S.; Environmental Science and Engineering Department, Bombay, Powai, India; email: skarmakar@iitb.ac.in
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [WR]

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