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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/21399
Title: In situ ozone production is highly sensitive to volatile organic compounds in Delhi, India
Authors: Nelson B.S.
Stewart G.J.
Drysdale W.S.
Newland M.J.
Vaughan A.R.
Dunmore R.E.
Edwards P.M.
Lewis A.C.
Hamilton J.F.
Acton W.J.
Hewitt C.N.
Crilley L.R.
Alam M.S.
Åahin Ü.A.
Beddows D.C.S.
Bloss W.J.
Slater E.
Whalley L.K.
Heard D.E.
Cash J.M.
Langford B.
Nemitz E.
Sommariva R.
Cox S.
Shivani
Gadi R.
Gurjar, Bhola Ram
Hopkins J.R.
Rickard A.R.
Lee J.D.
Published in: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Abstract: The Indian megacity of Delhi suffers from some of the poorest air quality in the world. While ambient NO2 and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have received considerable attention in the city, high ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations are an often overlooked component of pollution. O3 can lead to significant ecosystem damage and agricultural crop losses, and adversely affect human health. During October 2018, concentrations of speciated non-methane hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (C2-C13), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (o-VOCs), NO, NO2, HONO, CO, SO2, O3, and photolysis rates, were continuously measured at an urban site in Old Delhi. These observations were used to constrain a detailed chemical box model utilising the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.3.1. VOCs and NOx (NO + NO2) were varied in the model to test their impact on local O3 production rates, P(O3), which revealed a VOC-limited chemical regime. When only NOx concentrations were reduced, a significant increase in P(O3) was observed; thus, VOC co-reduction approaches must also be considered in pollution abatement strategies. Of the VOCs examined in this work, mean morning P(O3) rates were most sensitive to monoaromatic compounds, followed by monoterpenes and alkenes, where halving their concentrations in the model led to a 15.6 %, 13.1 %, and 12.9 % reduction in P(O3), respectively. P(O3) was not sensitive to direct changes in aerosol surface area but was very sensitive to changes in photolysis rates, which may be influenced by future changes in PM concentrations. VOC and NOx concentrations were divided into emission source sectors, as described by the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) v5.0 Global Air Pollutant Emissions and EDGAR v4.3.2_VOC_spec inventories, allowing for the impact of individual emission sources on P(O3) to be investigated. Reducing road transport emissions only, a common strategy in air pollution abatement strategies worldwide, was found to increase P(O3), even when the source was removed in its entirety. Effective reduction in P(O3) was achieved by reducing road transport along with emissions from combustion for manufacturing and process emissions. Modelled P(O3) reduced by ∼1/4 20 ppb h-1 when these combined sources were halved. This study highlights the importance of reducing VOCs in parallel with NOx and PM in future pollution abatement strategies in Delhi. © 2021 Beth S. Nelson et al.
Citation: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 21(17): 13609-13630
URI: https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13609-2021
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/21399
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: Copernicus GmbH
Keywords: aerosol
air quality
atmospheric pollution
concentration (composition)
in situ measurement
ozone
particulate matter
source apportionment
volatile organic compound
Delhi
ISSN: 16807316
Author Scopus IDs: 57209849810
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Author Affiliations: Nelson, B.S., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Stewart, G.J., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Drysdale, W.S., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Newland, M.J., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, Istanbul Üniversitesi, Cerrahpaşa Mühendislik Fakültesi, Üniversite Mahallesi Bailariçi Caddesi No:7, Avcllar, Istanbul, 34320, Turkey
Vaughan, A.R., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Dunmore, R.E., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Edwards, P.M., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Lewis, A.C., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Hamilton, J.F., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Acton, W.J., Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YW, United Kingdom
Hewitt, C.N., School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
Crilley, L.R., School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
Alam, M.S., School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
Åahin, Ü.A., Istanbul Üniversitesi, Cerrahpaşa Mühendislik Fakültesi, Üniversite Mahallesi Bailariçi Caddesi No:7, Avcllar, Istanbul, 34320, Turkey
Beddows, D.C.S., National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
Bloss, W.J., School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
Slater, E., School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
Whalley, L.K., School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
Heard, D.E., School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
Cash, J.M., UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Penicuik, Midlothian, Edinburgh, EH26 0QB, United Kingdom
Langford, B., UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Penicuik, Midlothian, Edinburgh, EH26 0QB, United Kingdom
Nemitz, E., UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Penicuik, Midlothian, Edinburgh, EH26 0QB, United Kingdom
Sommariva, R., School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom
Cox, S., Research Software Engineering Team, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, United Kingdom
Shivani, Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Indira Gandhi Delhi Technical University for Women, Kashmere Gate, Delhi, New Delhi, 110006, India
Gadi, R., Indian Institute of Technology, Uttarakhand, Roorkee, 247667, India
Gurjar, B.R., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Hopkins, J.R., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Rickard, A.R., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Lee, J.D., Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Funding Details: This work was supported by the Newton Bhabha fund administered by the UK Natural Environment Research Council through the DelhiFlux and ASAP projects of the Atmospheric Pollution and Human Health in an Indian Megacity (APHH-India) programme. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by the UK Natural Environment Research Council and the Earth System Science Organization, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, under the Indo-UK Joint Collaboration (Del-hiFlux). Beth S. Nelson and Gareth J. Stewart acknowledge the NERC SPHERES doctoral training programme for studentships. James M. Cash is supported by a NERC E3 DTP studentship. Natural Environment Research Council, NERC: NE/P01643X/1, NE/P016502/1; Ministry of Earth Sciences, एमओईएस: MoES/16/19/2017/APHH; Earth System Sciences Organization, Ministry of Earth Sciences, ईएसएसओ
Corresponding Author: Nelson, B.S.; Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Heslington, United Kingdom; email: bsn502@york.ac.uk Lee, J.D.; Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Heslington, United Kingdom; email: james.lee@york.ac.uk
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [CE]

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