Skip navigation
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/18102
Title: Comparison between different processing schedules for the development of ultrafine-grained dual-phase steel
Authors: Karmakar A.
Sivaprasad S.
Nath S.K.
Misra R.D.K.
Chakrabarti D.
Published in: Proceedings of Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science
Abstract: A comparative study was carried out on the development of ultrafine-grained dual-phase (DP) (ferrite-martensite) structures in a low-carbon microalloyed steel processed using two thermomechanical processing routes, (i) intercritical deformation and (ii) warm-deformation and intercritical annealing. The samples were deformed using Gleeble3500® simulator, maintaining a constant total strain (ε = 1) and strain rate (ε ̇ = 1/s). Evolution of microstructure and micro-texture was investigated by SEM, TEM, and EBSD. Ultrafine-grained DP structures could be formed by careful selection of deformation temperature, T def (for intercritical deformation) or annealing temperature, T anneal (for warm-deformation and annealing). Overall, the ferrite grain sizes ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 μm, and the sizes and fractions of the uniformly distributed fine-martensitic islands ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 μm and 15 to 45 pct, respectively. Dynamic strain-induced austenite-to-ferrite transformation followed by continuous (dynamic) recrystallization of the ferrite dictated the grain refinement during intercritical deformation, while, continuous (static) recrystallization by pronounced recovery dictated the grain refinement during the warm-deformation and the annealing. Regarding intercritical deformation, the samples cooled to T def indicated finer grain size compared with the samples heated to T def, which are explained in terms of the effects of strain partitioning on the ferrite and the heating during deformation. Alpha-fiber components dominated the texture in all the samples, and the fraction of high-angle boundaries (with >15 deg misorientation) increased with the increasing T def or T anneal, depending on the processing schedule. Fine carbide particles, microalloyed precipitates and austenitic islands played important roles in defining the mechanism of grain refinement that involved retarding conventional ferrite recrystallization and ferrite grain growth. With regard to the intercritical deformation, warm-deformation followed by annealing is a simpler process to control in the rolling mill; however, the need for high-power rolling mill and controlled annealing facility imposes industrial challenges. © 2014 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International.
Citation: Proceedings of Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science, (2014), 2466- 2479
URI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11661-014-2184-6
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/18102
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Springer Boston
Keywords: Annealing
Austenitic transformations
Dynamic recrystallization
Ferrite
Grain growth
Grain refinement
Grain size and shape
Martensitic transformations
Microstructural evolution
Rolling mills
Strain rate
Textures
Annealing temperatures
Austenite-to-ferrite transformation
Deformation temperatures
Ferrite grain growth
High angle boundaries
Industrial challenges
Intercritical annealing
Thermo-mechanical processing
Deformation
ISSN: 10735623
Author Scopus IDs: 55510104200
6602795640
7102759700
7203050969
12792743400
Author Affiliations: Karmakar, A., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 West Bengal, India
Sivaprasad, S., National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR-NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 Jharkhand, India
Nath, S.K., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 Uttarakhand, India
Misra, R.D.K., Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana, Lafayette Madison Hall, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette LA 70504-4130, United States
Chakrabarti, D., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 West Bengal, India
Funding Details: ANISH KARMAKAR, Ph.D. Student, and DEBALAY CHAKRABARTI, Associate Professor, are with the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302, West Bengal, India. Contact e-mail: debalay@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in S. SIVAPRASAD, Scientist, is with the National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR-NML), Jamshedpur 831 007, Jharkhand, India. S.K. NATH, Professor, is with the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667, Uttarakhand, India. R.D.K. MISRA, Professor of Chemical Engineering, Director, is with the Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall, Room 217M, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130. Manuscript submitted May 22, 2013. Article published online January 24, 2014;The financial support from the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), New Delhi is duly acknowledged. One of the authors (RDKM) gratefully acknowledges the support from the Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, U.S.A. for TEM studies.
Corresponding Author: Chakrabarti, D.; Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 West Bengal, India; email: debalay@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in
Appears in Collections:Conference Publications [MT]

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Show full item record


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.