Skip navigation
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/16693
Title: Active learning model as a way to prepare students for knowledge integration
Authors: Roy S.
Notaros B.M.
Pezeshki A.
Chen T.
Siller T.J.
Maciejewski A.A.
McMeeking L.B.S.
Published in: Proceedings of ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
Abstract: [No abstract available]
Citation: Proceedings of ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, (2018)
URI: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/16693
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: American Society for Engineering Education
ISSN: 21535965
Author Scopus IDs: 55364099700
35612330300
6601984822
8081901600
7003959597
7103305993
41762294900
Author Affiliations: Roy, S., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Notaros, B.M., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Pezeshki, A., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Chen, T., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Siller, T.J., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Maciejewski, A.A., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
McMeeking, L.B.S., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Funding Details: The three main courses of an electrical engineering undergraduate program are electronics, linear system analysis, and electromagnetics. Typically, these three courses are taught concurrently in the middle two years of an electrical engineering program without emphasizing the commonality and many interconnections between the content of these courses. In other words, students learn the key concepts in these courses in isolation. This is a critical drawback of the program because in this framework students are led to view the course contents as unconnected pieces. Thus, students lack the understanding of how these unconnected course materials build on each other to form the core knowledge expected of a competent electrical engineer. This lack of understanding manifests itself in low student motivation, interest, and knowledge regarding the discipline. Furthermore, it results in students perceiving a lack of value and career opportunities relative to the amount of effort required to go through the program [1]-[4]. As a result, attrition rates in engineering departments have been higher than expected. For example, the number of American students earning bachelor’s degrees increased by 16% over the past 10 years. However, the number of bachelor’s degrees earned in engineering decreased by 15% over the same period. Nationally, less than 50% of the students who enroll in engineering courses complete the program [1]. At Colorado State university, we typically lose a third of our electrical and computer engineering students during the first year and another third by the end of their undergraduate program [5]. In order to address this alarming trend of losing student interest in the discipline while simultaneously carrying out the visions of engineering in the 21st century, a radically new approach towards teaching and learning is needed. Toward this end, the authors of this paper, armed with a National Science Foundation Revolutionizing Engineering and Computer Science Departments (NSF RED) grant, are developing a new pedagogical framework where the emphasis is on connecting key concepts across the three main courses using practical real-world applications. This framework is referred to as a knowledge integration (KI) framework [5]-[7]. In this KI framework, the instructors of the three aforementioned courses work together to develop learning activities and cognitive exercises which enable students to recognize the interconnectedness between the concepts of the three courses. Such a framework properly contextualizes the topics in each course to make the student learning deeper and more meaningful.;This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, IUSE/Professional Formation of Engineers: Revolutionizing Engineering and Computer Science Departments (RED) under Grant EEC-1519438. Any opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and are not that of the National Science Foundation.
Appears in Collections:Conference Publications [ECE]

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Show full item record


Items in Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.