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dc.contributor.authorKumar N.-
dc.contributor.authorSharan S.-
dc.contributor.authorSrivastava S.-
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Partha-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-30T11:39:18Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-30T11:39:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationReproductive Toxicology (2014), 49(): 12-26-
dc.identifier.issn8906238-
dc.identifier.other24994688-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2014.06.008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/1545-
dc.description.abstractPhthalates are the diverse group of compounds abundantly present in environment. The present study shows the estrogenic potential of diethyl phthalate (DEP). The data showed that DEP increased the transactivation of ER in CHO and MCF-7 cells suggesting its interaction with ER. In vivo parameters like increased uterine epithelial cell height and up regulation of various steroidogenic genes were also observed in adult female rats. Our uterotrophic assay data from immature female rats suggested that DEP treatment resulted in augmentation of uterine weight as well as luminal epithelial cell heights in both vaginal and uterine tissues. Further, DEP was able to upregulate pS2 gene expression with simultaneous activation of MAPK pathway as demonstrated by increased p-ERK/ERK ratio. Taken together, the present data suggests that DEP acts as an estrogenic compound and based on these data further detailed studies would reveal its mode of action at cellular levels. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.language.isoen_US-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.-
dc.relation.ispartofReproductive Toxicology-
dc.subjectAromatase-
dc.subjectDiethyl phthalate-
dc.subjectEndocrine disruptor-
dc.subjectMAPK pathway-
dc.subjectOestrogen-
dc.subjectSteroidogenesis-
dc.titleAssessment of estrogenic potential of diethyl phthalate in female reproductive system involving both genomic and non-genomic actions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.scopusid57211774725-
dc.scopusid55661549600-
dc.scopusid40262604000-
dc.scopusid35509207200-
dc.affiliationKumar, N., Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 Uttarakhand, India-
dc.affiliationSharan, S., Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 Uttarakhand, India-
dc.affiliationSrivastava, S., Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 Uttarakhand, India-
dc.affiliationRoy, P., Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 Uttarakhand, India-
dc.description.fundingThis work is funded by Department of Biotechnology (No. BT/PR14836/AAQ/01/455/2010 ) and Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (No. 37(1402)/10/EMR II ), Government of India as funded projects to PR. NK thanks Department of Biotechnology, Government of India as source of fellowship and research support (Reference no. DBT-JRF/2009–10/481 ). The authors would also like to convey their sincere thanks to Professor Evan R. Simpson (Prince Henry Institute Clayton Victoria, Australia) for providing CYP (P-II)-luciferase plasmid and Professor Ilpo Huhtaniemi (Imperial College London, UK) for providing other plasmids used for transfection study.-
dc.description.correspondingauthorRoy, P.; Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 Uttarakhand, India; email: paroyfbs@iitr.ac.in-
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [BT]

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