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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/11676
Title: In vivo study of magnesium plate and screw degradation and bone fracture healing
Authors: Chaya A.
Yoshizawa S.
Verdelis K.
Myers N.
Costello B.J.
Chou D.-T.
Pal, Siladitya
Maiti S.
Kumta P.N.
Sfeir C.
Published in: Acta Biomaterialia
Abstract: Each year, millions of Americans suffer bone fractures, often requiring internal fixation. Current devices, like plates and screws, are made with permanent metals or resorbable polymers. Permanent metals provide strength and biocompatibility, but cause long-term complications and may require removal. Resorbable polymers reduce long-term complications, but are unsuitable for many load-bearing applications. To mitigate complications, degradable magnesium (Mg) alloys are being developed for craniofacial and orthopedic applications. Their combination of strength and degradation make them ideal for bone fixation. Previously, we conducted a pilot study comparing Mg and titanium devices with a rabbit ulna fracture model. We observed Mg device degradation, with uninhibited healing. Interestingly, we observed bone formation around degrading Mg, but not titanium, devices. These results highlighted the potential for these fixation devices. To better assess their efficacy, we conducted a more thorough study assessing 99.9% Mg devices in a similar rabbit ulna fracture model. Device degradation, fracture healing, and bone formation were evaluated using microcomputed tomography, histology and biomechanical tests. We observed device degradation throughout, and calculated a corrosion rate of 0.40 ± 0.04 mm/year after 8 weeks. In addition, we observed fracture healing by 8 weeks, and maturation after 16 weeks. In accordance with our pilot study, we observed bone formation surrounding Mg devices, with complete overgrowth by 16 weeks. Bend tests revealed no difference in flexural load of healed ulnae with Mg devices compared to intact ulnae. These data suggest that Mg devices provide stabilization to facilitate healing, while degrading and stimulating new bone formation.
Citation: Acta Biomaterialia (2015), 18(): 262-269
URI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2015.02.010
http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/11676
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Keywords: Fixation devices
Fracture fixation
Magnesium
MicroCT
ISSN: 17427061
Author Scopus IDs: 26532444900
22939649200
6507492984
56536158200
7005935484
54396733900
35321222100
7202014965
55663968300
6602739502
Author Affiliations: Chaya, A., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Yoshizawa, S., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Verdelis, K., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Myers, N., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Costello, B.J., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Chou, D.-T., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Pal, S., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Maiti, S., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Kumta, P.N., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Sfeir, C., Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Funding Details: This study was supported by the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials (Grant 0812348 ), the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania ( SAP4100061184 ), the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Craniofacial Regeneration , and PNK acknowledges the Edward R. Weidlein Chair Professorship funds from the Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. The authors would like to thank Andrew Holmes (University of Pittsburgh) for device fabrication, Dr. Michael Epperly (University of Pittsburgh) for device sterilization, and Dr. Alejandro Almarza (University of Pittsburgh) for assistance with mechanical testing. Appendix A
Corresponding Author: Sfeir, C.3501 Terrace St., 598 Salk Hall, United States
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [ME]

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