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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/10854
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dc.contributor.authorThunes J.R.-
dc.contributor.authorPal, Siladitya-
dc.contributor.authorFortunato R.N.-
dc.contributor.authorPhillippi J.A.-
dc.contributor.authorGleason T.G.-
dc.contributor.authorVorp D.A.-
dc.contributor.authorMaiti S.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-15T12:12:30Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-15T12:12:30Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomechanics (2016), 49(9): 1562-1569-
dc.identifier.issn219290-
dc.identifier.other27113538-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.03.034-
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.iitr.ac.in/handle/123456789/10854-
dc.description.abstractIncorporation of collagen structural information into the study of biomechanical behavior of ascending thoracic aortic (ATA) wall tissue should provide better insight into the pathophysiology of ATA. Structurally motivated constitutive models that include fiber dispersion and recruitment can successfully capture overall mechanical response of the arterial wall tissue. However, these models cannot examine local microarchitectural features of the collagen network, such as the effect of fiber disruptions and interaction between fibrous and non-fibrous components, which may influence emergent biomechanical properties of the tissue. Motivated by this need, we developed a finite element based three-dimensional structural model of the lamellar units of the ATA media that directly incorporates the collagen fiber microarchitecture. The fiber architecture was computer generated utilizing network features, namely fiber orientation distribution, intersection density and areal concentration, obtained from image analysis of multiphoton microscopy images taken from human aneurysmal ascending thoracic aortic media specimens with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) phenotype. Our model reproduces the typical J-shaped constitutive response of the aortic wall tissue. We found that the stress state in the non-fibrous matrix was homogeneous until the collagen fibers were recruited, but became highly heterogeneous after that event. The degree of heterogeneity was dependent upon local network architecture with high stresses observed near disrupted fibers. The magnitude of non-fibrous matrix stress at higher stretch levels was negatively correlated with local fiber density. The localized stress concentrations, elucidated by this model, may be a factor in the degenerative changes in aneurysmal ATA tissue. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.language.isoen_US-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomechanics-
dc.titleA structural finite element model for lamellar unit of aortic media indicates heterogeneous stress field after collagen recruitment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.scopusid56050124700-
dc.scopusid35321222100-
dc.scopusid57188926714-
dc.scopusid22235590100-
dc.scopusid7007069675-
dc.scopusid7005301469-
dc.scopusid7202014965-
dc.affiliationThunes, J.R., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States-
dc.affiliationPal, S., Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, India-
dc.affiliationFortunato, R.N., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States-
dc.affiliationPhillippi, J.A., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Center for Vascular Remodeling and Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States-
dc.affiliationGleason, T.G., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Center for Vascular Remodeling and Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States-
dc.affiliationVorp, D.A., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Center for Vascular Remodeling and Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States-
dc.affiliationMaiti, S., Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States-
dc.description.fundingResearch reported in this publication was supported in part by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01HL109132 (TGG), the National Science Foundation under Award Number CBET 1511504 (JRT and SM)​​, and an NPSC fellowship (JRT). Appendix A-
dc.description.correspondingauthorMaiti, S.; Department of Bioengineering, University of PittsburghUnited States; email: spm54@pitt.edu-
Appears in Collections:Journal Publications [ME]

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